Why we're no longer chasing the idea of perfect skin

by Carly Hibbins

Why we're no longer chasing the idea of perfect skin

The pursuit for perfection has undoubtedly been heightened by social media. We’re all guilty of using a filter every now and then, to smooth out our appearance or carve ourselves some cheekbones. Then the pandemic hit and we all find ourselves online a lot more, whether that was on zoom calls, TikTok or scrolling endlessly through Instagram. It’s become our normality to see celebs, influencers and friends alike using filters, and so in a world dominated by picture perfect selfies, the pressure to bare flawless skin 24/7 has quite frankly become too much.

So as we continue on our journey towards loving our skin, we wanted to address the reasons we’re no longer chasing this idea of ‘perfect’ skin and provide some hope amidst a digital world of artificial enhancement.

We’ve come to realise that skincare was never about trying to ‘fix’ or iron out our imperfections.

First of all, we’re celebrating the hard work of MUA and model Sasha Pallari. The ASA recently banned influencers from using filters to promote beauty products, thanks to her campaign #FilterDrop. She noticed that filters were exaggerating or altering the effect of the cosmetic or skincare being sold (bye misleading, unrealistic images of flawless skin).

Aside from social media though, lockdown taught us a thing or two about our skin too. Some of us invested more time and effort into our skincare routines, while others dipped their toe in the world of beauty devices as they couldn't make their regular salon appointments. A year later and we’re continuing to educate ourselves, and we’ve come to realise that skincare was never about trying to ‘fix’ or iron out our imperfections.

But that doesn’t mean we’re going to throw our perfected skincare rituals out the window, we love our devices and skincare products as much as the next beauty fanatic. But instead, we’ve realised that skincare is all about helping us to take care of our skin, and with this in mind, we’re beginning to develop a much better relationship with our appearance. Plus the hundreds (and probably thousands) we’ve spent on skincare has actually been contributing to keeping our largest organ happy and healthy.

Skincare has become and will continue to be an integral part of our daily routines.

Not only that, skincare is often a welcome escape from the stresses of everyday life. We’ve all experienced the joy of running a bath and putting on a face mask at the end of the day, or carving out some time in the evening for one of your favourite beauty devices.

For these reasons, skincare has become and will continue to be an integral part of our daily routines. Not to conform to beauty standards or social media pressures, but we invest in our skin for ourselves.

That's why we've realised that the world of beauty isn't about striving for perfection, but instead it's about self-care, health and most of allhappiness.

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